Presentations from Regeneration 16

r16Thanks again to all the speakers and attendees for an illuminating and enjoyable conference. Here are links to the speaker biographies and presentations from  Regeneration 16: Adapting to new realities  Human settlement in  an uncertain climate

12.30 pm Tour of DIT Grangegorman led by:

Terry Prendergast, Grangegorman Development Agency, and Dr.  Paul Horan, Head of Campus Planning, Dublin Institute of Technology

1.00 pm Sandwich lunch, St Lawrence’s

1.30 pm Keynote Gert Jan te Velde, Vanschagen Architects, Rotterdam

regenerating post-war social housing in the Netherlands

2.00 pm Panel 1 Future cities in an age of uncertainties,  Chair Dr. Deiric Ó Broin

Professor Barry McMullin, Dublin City University

planetary boundaries and societal resilience: peering (reluctantly) into the Age of Consequences,

Clare McKeown, Sustainability Manager, Belfast City Council

reimagining cities for resilience

Dr. Philip Lawton, Lecturer in Human Geography, Maynooth University

urban public space and creativity

3.00 Afternoon refreshments

3.30 Panel 2 New models of human settlement, Chair, Ciarán Cuffe

Jim Keogan, Former Assistant Chief Executive (Planning and Development), Dublin City Council

a vision for Dublin’s Docklands

Brid McGrath, Head of Social Policy, Respond! Housing Association

creating vibrant, socially integrated communities

Patrick Lydon, Rosie Lynch and Mark Dwan, Camphill Communities of Ireland

Nimble Spaces: creating inclusive neighbourhoods

4.30 pm Plenary

5.15 pm Launch of Irish Journal of Social, Economic and Environmental Sustainability by Professor Brian Norton, President, Dublin Institute of Technology

Followed by a Craft Beer at Barbers, formerly the Orchard Bar, Grangegorman Lower, Dublin 7

 

Page last updated 15th December 2016

 

Regeneration 16: Adapting to new realities

cccAs the pace of new construction in Dublin City increases, Dublin Institute of Technology’s 4th annual Regeneration Conference takes place on Friday afternoon 9th December 2016 in St Laurence’s Building in the new Grangegorman Campus of Dublin Institute of technology in Dublin 7. It will address the theme of “Adapting to new realities: Human settlement in  an uncertain climate”. Speakers from Rotterdam, Belfast, Galway and Dublin will discuss housing affordability; upgrading existing buildings in cooperation with communities, as well as tackling the global challenge of climate change by making greater use of our existing urban areas for new uses.

The event is organised by Dr. Deiric Ó Bróin and Ciarán Cuffe from DIT’s School of Transport Engineering, Environment and Planning. The attendance fee is  €55 or €15 unwaged with a €45 Early Bird rate for those who book by 26th November.  Attendees will have an opportunity to walk through DIT’s award winning Grangegorman Campus and the price of admission includes a craft beer reception after the conference in Grangegorman’s Orchard Bar. You can book your place on http://regeneration16.eventbrite.ie

The schedule for the day is as follows:

12.00 pm Registration, St Lawrence’s, DIT Grangegorman (across the road from the Clock Tower Building), Grangegorman Lower, Dublin 7

12.30 pm Tour of DIT Grangegorman led by:

Terry Prendergast, Grangegorman Development Agency, and  Dr. Paul Horan, Head of Campus Planning, Dublin Institute of Technology

1.00 pm Sandwich lunch, St Lawrence’s

1.30 pm Keynote Gert Jan te Velde, Vanschagen Architects, Rotterdam

-regenerating post-war social housing in the Netherlands

2.00 pm Panel 1 Future cities in an age of uncertainties,  Chair Dr. Deiric Ó Broin

Professor Barry McMullin, Dublin City University

-planetary boundaries and societal resilience: peering (reluctantly) into the Age of Consequences,

Clare McKeown, Sustainability Manager, Belfast City Council

-reimagining cities for resilience

Philip Lawton, Lecturer in Human Geography, Maynooth University

-urban public space and creativity

3.00 Afternoon refreshments

3.30 Panel 2 New models of human settlement, Chair, Ciarán Cuffe

Jim Keogan, Former Assistant Chief Executive (Planning and Development), Dublin City Council

-a vision for Dublin’s Docklands

Brid McGrath, Head of Social Policy, Respond! Housing Association

-creating vibrant, socially integrated communities

Patrick Lydon, Rosie Lynch and Mark Dwan, Camphill Communities of Ireland

-Nimble Spaces: creating inclusive neighbourhoods

4.30 pm Plenary

5.15 pm Launch of Irish Journal of Social, Economic and Environmental Sustainability by Professor Brian Norton, President, Dublin Institute of Technology

 Followed by a Craft Beer at Barber’s, formerly the Orchard Bar, Grangegorman Lower, Dublin 7

More information is available from Ciarán Cuffe who may be contacted on 087 265 2075

 

Presentations from Regeneration 2015: New Beginnings -the city and economic resilience

R15 attendeesDublin Institute’s School of Transport Engineering, Environment and Planning held it’s third annual Regeneration Conference in St. Laurence’s on the new Grangegorman Campus on 20th November 2015. Presentations ranged from an overview of regeneration in the Netherlands to innovative methods of using social media to highlight empty and underused spaces in Dublin’s inner city. These Presentations can be found at the links below.

Opening Words from Ardmhéara/Lord Mayor of Dublin, Cllr. Críona Ní Dhálaigh

 

Session One, What cities tell us, CHAIR Ciarán Cuffe

Dr. Paul Stouten,  Keynote – ‘Lessons from the Netherlands’  Chair of Spatial Planning & Strategy, TU Delft

Transitioning Towards Urban Resilience and Sustainability (TURAS) projects & Connect the Dots in collaboration with TURAS: Philip Crowe & Aoife Corcoran, Marisa Denker and Naomi Murphy, Johanna Varghese

Justin Doran, ‘Insights into the Determinants of Resilience of US Metropolitan Areas’, School of Economics, University College Cork, Ireland

 

Session Two, New Beginnings, CHAIR Dr. Deiric Ó Broin

Alison Harvey, ‘Empowering communities’, Planning and Development Officer, Irish Heritage Council

Conor Moloney, ‘New beginnings then and now’, Building Design Partnership/ Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE), London

Ciarán Cuffe, ‘Housing and the living city’, Chair of Urban Regeneration and Development, DIT

New Beginnings

R15 02Nov15On Friday 20th November 2015 , Dr. Deiric Ó Broin and Ciaran Cuffe of the School of Transport Engineering, Environment and Planning host the third annual regeneration and development conference in the new Dublin Institute of Technology Grangegorman Campus.

Urban Regeneration and Development  practitioners, community workers and students are invited to a conference to discuss regeneration in Ireland today. With speakers from Ireland, the UK and the Netherlands, the conference will focus on what cities tell us, and the lessons from elsewhere on new beginnings in economic, social and physical regeneration. You can book your place at http://regeneration15.eventbrite.ie/

Background

The evidence strongly indicates that the global economic crisis has had an uneven impact across cities and regions. This raises questions as to the resilience of different cities to economic crises, and the place of policy makers in enhancing economic resilience. Cities’ efforts to increase their resilience and achieve sustainability and increase growth and wellbeing can be significantly enhanced by making the best use of existing physical assets.

The concept of resilience relates to the degree to which various environments and systems can tolerate changing conditions and circumstances before adapting and reorganising around a new set of structures and processes. While the concept is sometimes understood only as resilience to climate change and geo environmental hazards, we propose its utility to local economic and social development be explored in broader terms – as an approach to the multifaceted nature of local and global challenges.

The contemporary challenges require innovative and sustainable solutions in the creation of more resilient and adaptive cities and regions, which balance economic competitiveness, environmental protection and social flourishing. These solutions derive in part from innovative enterprise and economic development approaches, and new thinking about the importance of “place”, building on the roles of urban design, economic development, citizen and civil society participation in policy formulation and technological innovations to ensure that cities are developed in a sustainable manner.

Regeneration 2015: New Beginnings -the city and economic resilience

Using the existing urban fabric to sustain and facilitate local development

Afternoon Conference, Friday 20th November 2015,

Dublin Institute of Technology, Grangegorman Campus,

St. Lawrence’s Building, Opposite the Clocktower

Grangegorman Lower, Dublin 7

Programme

12.00 Registration

12.30 Tour of new Grangegorman Campus

1.30 Light lunch

1.45 Opening, Ardmhéara/Lord Mayor of Dublin, Cllr. Críona Ní Dhálaigh

Session One, What cities tell us, CHAIR Ciarán Cuffe

2.00 Dr. Paul Stouten,  Keynote – ‘Lessons from the Netherlands’

Chair of Spatial Planning & Strategy, TU Delft

2.25 Transitioning Towards Urban Resilience and Sustainability (TURAS) projects & Connect the Dots in collaboration with TURAS: Philip Crowe & Aoife Corcoran, Marisa Denker and Naomi Murphy, Johanna Varghese

3.00 Justin Doran, ‘Insights into the Determinants of Resilience of US Metropolitan Areas’, School of Economics, University College Cork, Ireland

3.20 Questions and Discussion

3.40 Tea and coffee

Session Two, New Beginnings, CHAIR Dr. Deiric Ó Broin

4.00 Alison Harvey, ‘Empowering communities’

Planning and Development Officer, Irish Heritage Council

4.15 Conor Moloney, ‘New beginnings then and now’

Building Design Partnership/ Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE), London

4.30 Ciaran Cuffe, ‘Housing and the  living city’

Chair of Urban Regeneration and Development, Dublin Institute of Technology

4.45 Questions, discussion and conclusions

5.00 Craft Beer Reception, Orchard Bar, Grangegorman Lower

Presentations from Regeneration 2014 – Getting it right this time

Attendees at Regeneration 2014

Attendees at Regeneration 2014. Image courtesy Chris Reid

Thanks to everyone who came to the conference ‘Regeneration 2014’ on Friday 5th December 2014 in the School of Spatial Planning and Transport Engineering at the Dublin Institute of Technology Bolton Street, Dublin 1.

A special thanks to the speakers. If you are interested in further studies our two-year part-time Masters in Urban Regeneration and Development kicks off in January. We also offer an MSc in Local Development and Innovation.

Here’s the Programme from the day with links to the speaker biographies, their organisations  and presentations:

1400 Keynote

Jeroen Laven STIPO
Zoho: slow urbanism in Rotterdam

Session 1 Critical lessons from the recent past CHAIR  Dr. Deiric Ó Broin

Josephine Henry
Community Technical Aid

-staying the course

Larry O’Connell NESC

–lessons from the crisis

Jackie Bourke Playtime.ie

a feminist perspective

Gerard Mc Givern Newry and Mourne District Council

Newry, a case study

Q&A

1600 Tea and Coffee

Session 2 Mechanisms for future development CHAIR Ciarán Cuffe

Terry Prendergast Grangegorman Development Agency

a university in the making, developing Grangegorman

Brendan Kenny  Dublin City Council

new ideas for living in the city

Alan Curtis Pobal
it’s more than housing

Simon McGuinness Dublin School of Architecture

Energy Retrofit as a Regeneration Strategy

Q&A

1730 Drinks reception

 

Page last updated: December 2014

Afternoon Conference – Friday 5th December 2014

R14 21Nov14Dublin Institute of Technology, Bolton Street

Following on from last year’s successful ‘Regeneration -Beyond the Crisis’ conference the Dublin Institute of Technology is pleased to announce its second regeneration conference ‘Regeneration 2014 -Getting it right this time’ in early December. The conference is organised by the DIT School of Spatial Planning and Transport Engineering, in conjunction with the Institute of Economic Development (UK).

As construction activity increases this dynamic gathering will brings together experts in regeneration from Ireland and beyond to discuss cutting edge themes in urban renewal and development. It discusses the strands of economic investment, community involvement and design that underpin successful regeneration projects. It will focus on critical lessons from the recent past and potential mechanisms for future development.

PROGRAMME 5th December 2014, DIT Bolton Street, Room 446

1330 Registration and sandwiches

1400 Keynote

Jeroen Laven STIPO – Zoho: slow urbanism in Rotterdam

1420 Session 1 Critical lessons from the recent past

Josephine Henry Community Technical Aid -dissecting regeneration

Larry O’Connell NESC –lessons from the crisis

Jackie Bourke Playtime.ie -a feminist perspective

Gerard Mc Givern Newry and Mourne District Council –Newry, a case study

Q&A

1600 Tea and Coffee

1620 Session 2 Mechanisms for future development

Terry Prendergast Grangegorman Development Agency – a university in the making

Brendan Kenny Dublin City Council – new ideas for living in the city

Alan Curtis Pobal –it’s more than housing

Simon McGuinness Dublin School of Architecture –Tackling fuel poverty as a neighbourhood regeneration strategy

Q&A

1730 Drinks reception

Book your place on https://regeneration2014.eventbrite.ie

Regeneration for Dún Laoghaire?

Dalkey tent 2There was a packed out tent for the debate about the future of Dún Laoghaire that formed part of the Dún Laoghaire Writers Festival last week. The debate was titled ‘Dun Laoghaire: Slow Death or Rapid Recovery?…’ Well done to David McWilliams for organising the event, and coming up with the catchy title. On the panel were Bruce Katz from Washington’s Brookings Institution; historian Peter Pearson, actor Eamon Morrissey and cafe owner Derek Bennett. The discussion was chaired by journalist Ann Marie Hourihane.

Dún Laoghaire has a lot going for it, but has its fair share of challenges. The town has had been linked with Dublin for better or worse for much of its history. Three hundred years ago according to the Dún Laoghaire Harbour Company, verses were written inviting the ladies of Dublin “to repair to Dunleary where they would find honest residents and could procure good ale.”

Dún Laoghaire and Dublin have been connected by rail for almost two hundred years (since 1834 to be precise). Interestingly the good people of Kingstown originally objected, and put together a fighting fund of five hundred guineas to try and stop its construction. However the railway, and the harbour’s constrcution led to the town’s expansion.

The release of some of the de Vesci lands for development appears to have precipitated an early version of the Celtic Tiger between 1890 and 1910 when much of the mile-long Georges Street was built, and dates often grace the engravings and plasterwork on the upper floors of these buildings. It could be questioned with hindsight whether a mile long retail street was ever a commercial proposition, and undoubtedly there were winners and losers in the retail market. My memory of Dún Laoghaire as a child in the 1960s and 1970s was of a bustling market town, although new shopping centres such as Stillorgan and Cornelscourt chipped away at Dún Laoghaire’s retail base.

The opening of the DART commuter rail service in 1984 brought closer links between the Dublin City and Dún Laoghaire. The dependable regular service allowed workers to choose rail rather than face traffic jams, but it also attracted shoppers out of Dún laoghaire and into Dublin city centre. The town’s pleasant location boosted house prices, but high demand and a lack of affordable smaller houses priced many couples out of the environs of the town and towards new estates of semi-detached homes in the west of the County. This shows in the demographic mix today which has 15% less young people and 15% more retirees than the County average. This lack of spending power hits hard.

Dun Laoghaire demographics

The creation of the awkwardly titled and shaped new county of Dún Laoghaire Rathdown did little to boost the town although the administrative offices were placed adjacent to the reconfigured town hall. The opening of Dundrum Shopping Centre in the west of the county was a body blow to the town, and its offer of free parking and indoor malls attracted shoppers from the coast. Dún Laoghaire’s 1970’s shopping centre began to show its age, and its absurd design with a multi-storey park-park blocking the view of the sea failed to attract a new generation of shoppers. Even Marks and Spencers only lasted a few years on the main street before closing its doors as the Celtic Tiger came to an end.

Peter Pearson in his book ‘Between the Mountains and the Sea (1998) states that:

“Dun Laoghaire is a residential town and part of the greater suburbs of Dublin, but it has lost many of its commercial enterprises and educational establishments and has relatively few cultural attractions for a place of its size and importance.” He goes on to say “It has all the benefits of a town, and … (it) is always a joy to walk the magnificent piers and see the terraces and church spires against the backdrop of the Dublin mountains.”

Perhaps the building of the heavily criticised new County Library on the waterfront will attract more people to the town again, if even to visit and wonder what all the fuss was about. I suspect it will be a bit like the Eiffel Tower – a construction of much controversy that slowly was adopted by the citizens. Certainly the covering over of sections of the railway has been welcomed, and the landscaping is of a high quality. However this has led to a divided town – the Monaco/Beirut effect as Derek Bennett termed it.

Bruce Katz had some good advice. He started off by saying that Dún laoghaire wasn’t that bad compared to many American cities. One could hardly disagree! He went on to give three pieces of advice.

1. Form networks to promote the town’s rejuvenation. He acknowleged the passion at the debate, and felt that this combined with the strong heritage or cultural memory could only be a good thing. He said that the Public, Private and Civic spheres needed to co-operate.

2. He said the town needs a vision, grounded in evidence. Again, a good clear proposal that met with broad agreement. The County Development Plan is one thing, but you need a vision to get the ball rolling.

3. Set up a series of interventions to move things on. He suggested that what was needed was the infrastructure that attracts the ‘Young Millenials’ as he termed them. Free wi-fi on the main street was mentioned, but he also said walkability, cyclability and liveability are crucial.

He suggested that maybe a three day ‘hackathon’ or charette might produce a few good ideas. Finally (and I may have misquoted him), he said a Dolly Parton approach was required – Figure out who you are and do it – be yourself!

Derek Bennett of Harry’s Cafe asked if anyone from Council management was in the room. One hand went up. He painted a fairly bleak picture, suggesting that footfall was continuing to decline, and that the Council appeared to have a hand-off approach,. However he had met the new County Manager Philomena Poole and was looking forward to working with her. He talked about how he had to reduce the wages he pays his staff by 20%, and suggested that a bit of innovative thinking was needed on parking. He said that the Council doesn’t understand the link between parking, footfall and revenue.

Peter Pearson said that the town was always in the shadow of the Capital. It has also been in the shadow of Monkstown, Glasthule and Dalkey. On parking he felt that there should perhaps be two hours free parking in the morning, as they offer in Skibereen.

Eamon Morrisey had some great memories of sea-faring types in the rare old times but he put his finger on the button when he stated that Dún Laoghaire never really had a ‘centre’ and perhaps this was part of the problem.

I’d start with tackling the problem identified by Eamon Morrisey. Sit down with the owners of the old Shopping Centre (apparently a hard-to-contact group of investors from around Galway) and convince them of the merits of blowing up or demolishing their building.

As part of the re-building I’d suggesting putting in a decent-sized town square just opposite St. Michael’s Church that would provide some breathing space in the centre of town. Imagine catching the last of the sun on a Summer’s evening as you look down from your balcony at children playing in the centre of a car-free new Town Square with a breeze blowing in the trees. Now there’s a challenge.

Regeneration is a multifaceted challenge. The Dublin Institute of Technology has set up a new Masters of Science in Regeneration and Development and there’s more information about it here.